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Ozone depletion

NASA research, published in "Geophysical Research Letters", implies that the ozone layer is starting to recover due to man's actions. The decline in ozone-depleting chemicals, specifically chlorine from chlorofluorocarbon (an effect from the 1980's CFC ban, say the scientists), has resulted in 20 percent less depletion since 2005.

  1. Newsweek (Image)

Changes:

  1. Research published in "Geophysical Research Letters" implies that the ozone layer is starting to recover.
  2. Research published in "Geophysical Research Letters" implies that the ozone layer is recovering.
  3. NASA research published in "Geophysical Research Letters" implies that the ozone layer is starting to recover. The decline in ozone-depleting chemicals, specifically chlorine from chlorofluorocarbon (an effect from the 1980's CFC ban, say the scientists), has resulted in 20 percent less depletion since 2005.
  4. NASA research published in "Geophysical Research Letters" implies that the ozone layer is starting to recover due to man's actions. The decline in ozone-depleting chemicals, specifically chlorine from chlorofluorocarbon (an effect from the 1980's CFC ban, say the scientists), has resulted in 20 percent less depletion since 2005.
  5. NASA research, published in "Geophysical Research Letters", implies that the ozone layer is starting to recover due to man's actions. The decline in ozone-depleting chemicals, specifically chlorine from chlorofluorocarbon (an effect from the 1980's CFC ban, say the scientists), has resulted in 20 percent less depletion since 2005.

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